It's Time to Talk: Forums on Race

Break through the barriers that perpetuate racism.


On November 4, 2015, the YWCA will host the Thirteenth Annual It's Time to Talk: Forums on RaceTM featuring keynote speaker Claudia Rankine, and introducing new initiatives to increase the sustained impact of this gathering of 1,200 leaders. Diverse leaders from business, education, arts and community service came together to move Minnesota forward through honest conversation and powerful action.

The strength of our future depends on our ability to develop new skills around inclusion and equity, understand the realities of racism today and to commit ourselves to action.

 



Take Action
Corporations, nonprofit organizations, religious groups and schools have found participating in It's Time to Talk to be thought-provoking and inspirational. Based on feedback from attendees at previous events, you will leave inspired to personally take action to improve race relations at work, in the community, and with family and friends.


Make an Impact




13th Annual It's Time to Talk: Forums on Race
Wed, November 4, 2015

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View photos of last year's event


Keynote Presentation: Claudia Rankine


Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, a play, numerous video collaborations, and is the editor of several anthologies.

Rankine’s critically acclaimed book, Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf, 2014), uses poetry, essay, cultural criticism, and visual images to explore what it means to be an American citizen in a “post-racial” society. A defining text for our time, Citizen was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry. Citizen also holds the distinction of being the only poetry book to be a New York Times bestseller in the nonfiction category. Additionally, Citizen was a finalist for the National Book Award and was selected as an NPR Best Book of 2014: Claudia Rankine’s poetry, by turns lyrical and narrative, is always stunning in its ability to speak to the present American moment.

 “The challenge of making racism relevant, or even evident, to those who do not bear the brunt of its ill effects is tricky. Rankine brilliantly pushes poetry’s forms to disarm readers and circumvent our carefully constructed defense mechanisms against the hint of possibly being racist ourselves.” —New York Times